I Tried Meal Kits from Chef’d and Here’s What I Thought — Product Review

Item: Chef’d Meal Kits
Price: Prices vary pretty widely, but most two-serving meals are around $30. Shipping is extra for orders under $40, but it’s free above that threshold.
Overall impression: Interesting recipes with high-quality ingredients. Although Chef’d might be a little too expensive to have every day, that’s not really their aim. They don’t offer a subscription service, so hungry customers are encouraged to order whatever meal they want, whenever they want it.

The catalog of dinners is sourced, as the name suggests, from actual chefs. Apart from a few options geared toward children, there’s really nothing boring among the offerings! All of the meals I ordered came together in a reasonable amount of time, tasted wonderful, and were very filling.

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23 Delicious Slow-Cooker Recipes for Busy Weeknights — Recipes from The Kitchn

We can think of few things better than walking through the door after a long day and knowing that a home-cooked meal awaits us. And since we don’t have our own personal live-in chefs, we’ll have to rely on our slow cookers to help us out.

These comforting recipes take just a little bit of prep work in the morning or the night before, and then rely on the slow cooker to do the heavy lifting. Your future self will thank you.

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Millennials Are Too Lazy to Eat Cereal for Breakfast — Food News

Cooking can be a challenge for some people. You need money, time, and skills in the kitchen to put a meal on the table. Don’t have those three things? You can always go out to eat at a restaurant, order in, or pick up something easy at the grocery store. It’s always nice to have a couple cans of soup, or some cereal around when you don’t have time to make something from scratch.

But apparently, for millennials, the simple act of dumping cereal in a bowl and pouring milk on top has become problematic.

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Recipe: Yogurt Soup with Daikon — Slow-Cooker Recipes from Neela Paniz

One of the first things I learned when I began using a slow cooker was to avoid dairy, or at the very least, wait to add it at the end of cooking since it would curdle or separate if cooked for a longer period of time. Which is why I was surprised to find a recipe in Neela Paniz’s cookbook, The Indian Slow Cooker, for yogurt soup.

Not only did I find the concept of a hot yogurt soup intriguing, but I was also interested in the fact that it could be done in the slow cooker at all. What prevents it from breaking? How does the tang of yogurt hold up over time? I went straight to the source for the answers.

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